Exploring The Effect Of Music on Creative Ageing

 

Music as therapy in aged care will be examined for the effect it has on creativity and resilience in ageing by Professor Andrea Creech, a professor in music education at the Université Laval in Canada, at the International Arts and Health Conference in Sydney from 30 October to 1st November. Held at the Art Gallery of NSW in Sydney, the overarching theme of the conference is “Mental Health and Resilience through the Arts”.

Andrea makes the point that society recognises the human need to be cared for and to belong, but often forgets how important it is for people to make a contribution, to feel valued and to be creative. “Music builds resilience, is cognitively engaging and is associated with lasting effects on brain plasticity, as well as with non-musical brain functions, such as language and attention.” she said “but perhaps the most important point is that making music is both social and communicative and is strongly related to sustaining a sense of who we are.”

Music has been used for people with dementia to great effect, as it has been found that music triggers an emotional response, tied to a memory.  Emotions and memory work side by side, so when music from a particular era is played it will often trigger memories of the person’s past that they have long forgotten.

Pete McDonald, who works full-time as a registered music therapist at Hammond Care and other aged care services in NSW, always finishes his workshop series with a public concert to which the family and friends of the participants are invited. He ensures participants are involved physically in music making, playing instruments and singing. He told Australian Ageing Agenda “Not only do we see the benefits in the social and cognitive realms, but also physical health benefits such as improved lung capacity.”

I find it heartening to hear that Professor Creech believes “It is entirely possible, given the opportunity and support, to be creative at any age”, but she then questions whether enough opportunities are provided for this. As an Aged Care Placement Consultant I regularly inspect aged care facilities and I always look for positive activities such as music workshops for my clients. It is clear that creative therapies, such as music, are positive on many levels and society’s attitude to older people need to change to allow this expression. One way is through intergenerational activity, and music is a great vehicle.

 

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