Exciting New Research On Dementia

Dr. Sarang Kim

Would you have thought that the number one concern facing people with dementia and their carers was social stigma? Researcher Dr. Sarang Kim from ANU conducted a national survey on people’s attitudes to dementia which showed that the general public have negative views and wish to avoid people living with dementia. Dr. Kim was the recipient of the 2016 Alzheimer’s Australia Hazel Hawke Research Grant in Dementia Care and has concentrated her research on the social effects on a person with dementia.

Following the survey Dr.Kim is developing a Dementia Stigma Reduction Program (DESeRvE), which is based on the idea that contact with people living with the condition and education is the best way to reduce stigma. She will use frequently asked questions about people living with dementia sourced from focus groups to have short video clips produced. They will feature people with dementia and their carers answering the questions. Dr. Kim is hopeful that this ‘virtual contact’ and education will help to reduce the level of stigma.

Many of my clients are people living with dementia who reach a stage where they need the level of care provided in an aged care facility. I have noticed that my services as an Aged Care Placement Consultant are being called upon more often by young people with dementia. Most of these clients are in their fifties or sixties and have been living with the condition for about ten years, so the onset was quite young.

Hope for a reduction in the effects of dementia is being offered by the research undertaken by Dr Rebecca Nisbet from the Queensland Brain Institute, who has discovered a feasible treatment. “One of the main causes of Alzheimer’s disease and frontotemporal dementia, two of the most common forms of dementia, is the aggregation of the protein tau within neurons. In our study we generated an antibody specific for tau (RN2N), and investigated its efficacy in clearing tau in a mouse model of frontotemporal dementia,” Dr Nisbet said.

Dr. Nisbet went on to explain that the presence of a blood–brain barrier has historically made delivery of treatment drugs to the brain difficult, but she had found that by using ultrasound, which transiently opens the barrier, that RN2N could be delivered resulting in improvements to memory. Alzheimer’s Australia also provided funding for this important research project, which still has several years to go before it could be offered as a treatment to humans.

 

One thought on “Exciting New Research On Dementia

  1. Pingback: The Leisure Seeker Film Opens Up a Moral Discussion on Dementia | Oasis Aged Care Solutions

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