A New Approach To Design of Aged Care Facilities

Aged Care Facility

An Aged Care Facility

A group of design professionals, innovators, planners and seniors came together in a charrette (a workshop devoted to planning a design or solving a problem) to look at a new way of creating aged care facilities. Rather than design just for comfort, or looks, the group aim was to design to aid longevity. Hosted by The University of Queensland and DMA Engineers, the 120 assembled experts considered this a rare opportunity for teams of people from different fields to collaborate in some blue sky thinking.

DMA Engineers managing director Russell Lamb discussed the current dischotomy.

“It’s quite restrictive. In fact, it’s probably one of the most restrictive. I think that’s one of the struggles that the industry’s dealing with at the moment, where we hear terms about ageing in place, but if you go from a retirement living facility, where it’s in most regards an apartment that younger people in their twenties, thirties, forties may be happy to live in, to when you’re actually going to an aged care Class 9C patient room. The amount of services and facilities within that room are fundamentally different.

“One of the challenges the industry is really faced with is how we can have a space which transforms over a matter of years and transforms in a way that maintains the character of the place and doesn’t become too clinical, too quickly.”

The group was challenged to create visionary, innovative and highly connected designs to meet the needs of an intergenerational community in 2050. It was noted that too often aged care facilities are cut off from the wider community by virtue of cheaper land forcing providers to the outskirts of town.

The University of Queensland’s Director of the Healthy Ageing Initiative, Professor Laurie Buys, said

“Older people are thinking and acting very differently than ever before, and we know that future generations of older people will have very high expectations about maintaining their engaged lifestyles.”

The experts gathered into groups and took part in a design competition. The chance to throw the rule book out of the window was appealing for many of the designers who were able to think more generally about how the needs of older people can be met in a hypothetical way, rather than designing to a client’s brief. A common thread emerged of physical and social connectedness, key to promoting increased choice, economic development and job creation. Designs visualized spaces that enabled older people to be creative and productive rather than just existing in places with activities to pass the time away.

 

Thanks to Aged Care Insite for information used in this blog.

 

 

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