Roller Coaster Ride Placement in Aged Care

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Since earlier in the year when Covid-19 made its way to Australia it’s been a roller coaster ride in my job as a Placement Consultant for Aged Care Accommodation. In Melbourne all went quiet with families tending to keep their loved ones at home during the original lockdown in March and April and then it got very busy when restrictions were lifted in mid May. I was suddenly fielding multiple enquiries and arranging tours again as most aged care facilities had recommenced showing their homes to potential residents. They had also relaxed the isolation period for residents entering care on either a permanent or respite basis. Then lockdown restrictions were again enforced on 9th July.

Up To Date Information

Gathering information for my clients about care and fees for each aged care facility and arranging tours (when available) has became more labour intensive as each facility has different procedures for touring and admissions during these restrictions.  As the health restrictions change so do the facilities’ procedures, making it an ongoing task. For prospective residents it is very difficult to navigate and they rely on my gathering the correct information and providing advice.

Of course they wonder if the different procedures will guarantee that they will be safer and less likely to catch Covid-19. It is very difficult to assess the likely outcome between the different procedures in each facility. One can only make an educated guess based on the Health Experts’ advice.

More Seeking Aged Care Accommodation

During this second lockdown I am finding there is a big difference in the number of enquiries I am receiving from families needing to place their loved ones in aged care. I think families held off from having their loved ones admitted to an aged care home during the first wave, and now that we have a second wave they can’t continue to hold out until we are Covid-free, as there is no knowing how long it will be.

However, with such a large developing number of aged care homes in Victoria reporting cases of Covid-19, clients who had chosen their new home last week are now questioning whether it is safer to stay at home until aged care homes are clear of the virus.

Screening Process 

All aged care homes have a similar screening process for residents before entering a home. Everyone must show evidence of a current flu vaccination, submit to a temperature check and answer questions relating to general health and whether they’ve had contact with someone who might have Covid-19.

Restrictions on Touring Aged Care Faciilties

As Victoria is now in Stage 3 restrictions, most aged care homes have suspended all ‘meet & greet’ appointments for tours. Meetings can be arranged so that a client can speak to the staff over the phone, via Skype, Zoom or Face Time. Intending residents can view photos of the home’s interiors and suites and have virtual tours. There are still some aged care homes that provide restricted tours allowing viewing only of the resident’s proposed new bedroom with no interaction with other residents in the home.

Professional Help

I’m finding that now, more than ever, people are seeking my help as a Placement Consultant to find the most suitable aged care facility for their loved one or a client. With so many variables to consider now and a changing landscape it is a comfort to many to be able to use a professional to assist them.

 

 

 

 

Visitors to Aged Care Homes

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The Prime Minister went on national television last Tuesday to tell aged care facilities in Australia to go easy on their lockdown measures. He said the recommendation from the national cabinet was for a maximum of two visits per resident per day in the resident’s room. He was concerned for the welfare and health of residents in aged care if they were not receiving regular visits from their families.

Several things have come to my notice as an Aged Care Placement Consultant about the situation. Aged Care Facilities seem to vary from one to another with how they are dealing with COVID-19, as mentioned in my last blog. When it comes to visitors some are in strict lockdown, others are following the government recommendations. Staff are busier than ever, as they don’t have the help of volunteers and other support services; for example, they are having to conduct all the activities to keep residents occupied.

General Secretary of the NSW Nurses and Midwives Associations, Brett Holmes, said the government needed to provide additional staff to aged care facilities so they could screen visitors before allowing them in. I agree with this and can understand the difficulties aged care homes will face in monitoring visitors, I’m aware that even at the moment where families are allowed to visit their loved ones in palliative care, in some facilities it is only for 15 minutes, yet when asked to leave they ask for another 5 minutes, then another 5 – this all takes up staff time, adding an extra burden. There will be further calls on staff time when the directive starting in May that visitors must have the up to date flu immunisation comes into effect, as this will need policing.

Brett Holmes went on to say “There are qualified nurses out there looking for work and if the Commonwealth Government wants to open up the aged care facilities, then that should be done in the safest possible way.That should also mean of course the additional resources of PPE to allow that screening to be undertaken in the same way that our public health system is responding to this risk of people from outside the facility bringing in the COVID-19.”

I have noticed when that some aged care facilities are contacting families and asking them if they are content with the precautions the facility is taking and, to my knowledge, most families are generally understanding why the facilities have taken those precautions and that it is for the protection of residents.

Last week I placed a gentleman in an aged care facility and his wife was upset that she couldn’t visit him over the weekend. As I have said before, each facility is dealing with the situation differently. The same goes for retirement villages. I am helping a client to find a suitable retirement village and one place we were interested in would not allow a site visit but also won’t allow a resident to move in unless they have seen the facility in person. Another retirement village will allow a site visit, but only one person at a time.

I am finding that only people in an emergency are now seeking aged care accommodation as they don’t want to self isolate within the facility for 14 days once they move in, they don’t like the idea of no visitors and don’t want to spend the money and make a monumental move to a home site-unseen. Trying times indeed!

 

 

A New Test To Tackle Falls in The Elderly

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Older people fear having a fall, more than a bag snatch or a home invasion, according to Professor Stephen Lord, a senior principal fellow at Neuroscience Research Australia at the launch of a new screening test for falls, a collaboration between NeuRA and the aged care company, the Mark Moran Group. He stated that the reason they fear this so much is it is often the precursor to losing their independence. Once an elderly person goes to the Emergency Department of a hospital as a result of a fall and into the hospital system, they are often assessed as being unable to continue caring for themselves, resulting in them moving to an aged care facility.

Research shows one in three people over 65 will have one or more falls every year. At that rate the number of new hospitals will have to increase at a rapid rate to cope with falls related injuries.

Professor Lord stated that the cost of falls to the economy is greater than any other injury, including car crashes.

If a fall is serious, 43 per cent of people aged 70 or older who have one will be admitted to hospital. Currently, falls account for 250,000 hospital bed days every year, and will rise to 450,000 by 2050. Of those who are hospitalised, about 10 per cent will move to an aged care facility for the first time.

The new screening test, launched this week, can predict with 75 per cent accuracy the risk of someone over 60 having a fall – and recommend ways to prevent one. The kit, FallScreen +, has nine assessments. These relate to general wellbeing, including pain and mental health; regular exercise; executive function (which includes ability to assess and negotiate hazards in an unfamiliar place), and eyesight, including ability to see light and shade (which helps to avoid trip hazards).

The kit will be trialled at aged care facilities owned by the Mark Moran Group, and will also be released as an app pitched at those who work in aged care, including physiotherapists, psychologists and others. A simplified test is being developed for general practitioners.

As an Aged Care Placement Consultant I highly recommend that elderly people have a future plan in place so that if they do have a fall or several falls and find themselves in a situation where they can no longer stay safely in their home, they have a plan B ready to go. If they have developed a plan, they are in a position of having more choice and being able to move to a facility that suits their needs, tastes and location. This can make a big difference to the outcome; it can be a positive move.

Some facts taken from Julie Power’s Sydney Morning Herald article published Aug 27 2019.