Funding to Help Forgotten Australians

aimee-vogelsang-DbJR10fEteE-unsplash-1Forgotten Australians, also known as Care Leavers, are people who were in an orphanage or other institution while a child up until 1989 and experienced either horrendous physical or sexual abuse, or bad care practices. More than 500,000 Australians endured poor living conditions as an institutionalised child. In recognition of their needs $500,000 in funding was provided by the former Minister for Aged Care, Mr Ken Wyatt to South Australian not-for-profit organisation, Helping Hand Aged Care, to develop their guide Real Care The Second Time Around.

Helping Hands believes the funding they have received from the Government will allow for communication and understanding between aged care providers and Forgotten Australians.

Helping Hand Project Manager Diana O’Neil said.“We are hopeful this booklet is the first step in a longer conversation that will lead to influencing policy and practices within the aged care sector.” The guide was released by Helping Hands in February, and recognises choice and control is important but a challenge to Forgotten Australians. Some of the suggestions in the guide include offering care based on choice, transparency and understanding.

To accompany the work from Helping Hand, Flinders University has begun research into the needs of Forgotten Australians to create tangible recommendations for aged care facilities.

Flinders University’s College of Medicine and Public Health recently acquired a $50,000 Strategic Research Grant from the Australian Association of Gerontology and the Flinders Foundation, to explore the health impacts, needs, preferences, barriers and experiences of the Forgotten Australians moving into aged care or accessing aged care services.

Monica Cations, Flinders University Research fellow and Chief Investigator of the Forgotten Australians study, will be leading the study with the findings and recommendations to be released next year in March/April.

Ms Cations says, “Aged care is really terrifying for people that were raised in these types of environments. The concept of being re-institutionalised is terrifying for a lot of people. We need to understand and explore what are the other options. Because a lot of aspects of general aged care can be really unsafe for people who have experienced traumatic childhoods or institutionalisation as children. But we don’t know a lot about what exactly needs to change to meet their needs.”

Forgotten Australians from South Australia will be interviewed to develop recommendations for aged care facilities to implement. The research team report they were overwhelmed by the amount of Forgotten Australians wanting to participate.

Thanks to the Aged Care Guide website.

The Rise of Robots in Aged Care

Robots in care

The rise of technology has led to it being used increasingly in health and aged care settings. Infra-red vein finders, nurse-specific smart devices and various monitoring tools are being introduced on wards whilst Skype and iPads and other devices are helping to keep families connected to loved ones who are in aged care. And across the world we are seeing the rise of robots in care.

Lamson, a robot currently being used in residential care in Melbourne, delivers medicine and meals, takes laundry and can even use lifts. I met this robot recently when visiting a newly built aged care facility, Trinity Manor,in Greensborough that opened its doors to residents in May this year. As a Placement Consultant, helping find suitable aged care for clients, I have the privilege of visiting new aged care facilities to assess their suitability for my clientele and I have to confess this was the first time I had seen such a robot in action.

These robots will become more common. The latest innovation are telepresence robots which are controlled by a remote user, in the case of Lamson it was staff, but many used in other places are actually controlled by family members of the resident. A study of these robots in Finland found that for the elderly, telepresence provides benefits over non-mobile video connections as they can interact with it in a more natural manner. The robots also help the elderly to feel secure, as they feel that their relatives or carers can keep an eye on them virtually and interact with them.

Griffith University has been using social robots to interact with people with dementia, and a new start-up out of Sydney has been experimenting with robots that can help patients take their medicine.

Ikkiworks’ new robot, ikki, is part companion, part clinician. Trialled primarily with children living with cancer, ikki can take the temperature of a patient, as well as identify medication and alert the patient if the medication is incorrect. What a boon that would be for elderly people that forget to take their medication. Ikkiworks plan to develop the robot so it could eventually be used in aged care, providing companionship whilst monitoring health.

Wendy Moyle from Griffith University sees the next innovation in robot technology being the development of assistive robots integrated with smart homes, assisting elderly adults to stay home longer.“These are multifunctional robots that are voice activated, can assist a person with activities of daily living, monitor wellbeing and report wellbeing to healthcare professionals and family and can virtually connect the person.” she said.

We are certainly living in the technological age and it’s encouraging to see how these developing technologies can help our ever growing aged population to enjoy better care.

Meeting Residents’ Expectations in Aged Care Homes

As an Aged Care Placement Consultant I find  clients always ask me about two main issues. The first is staff ratios, which has become a hot topic in aged care. This is a difficult question to answer since the introduction of Ageing In Place, because most Aged Care Homes now have a mixture of high and low needs and staff numbers are rostered according to care needs and work load at any given time. I find the most helpful question to ask of an aged care facility is the availability of Registered Nurses on each shift, including overnight, as well as the availability of Doctors on weekends and overnight.

The second most often asked question is about the quality of food, which is another big issue in aged care homes.  I can understand why it’s so important. Apart from the nutritional value, food plays a major role in the daily life of a resident. The anticipation of meals is an important focus and having a good feed leaves them satisfied. Everyone enters a home anticipating the food will be up to standard and palatable; some are disappointed at the quality, while others find the meals delicious.

Earlier in my career when I worked in Aged Care Facilities I was amused that it was often the people who had lived alone surviving on toast or crumpets who complained the most about the food. I would hear the complaints the Chef received and they were often contradictory, some thought the soup too hot, some too cold, some found the gravy too thick, some too thin. I realised how difficult it was to deliver meals for such a large and diverse population, also taking into account medical conditions, and still please everyone. I can assure you there are many residents who do enjoy their food.

In my experience, the people who choose to enter residential aged care and embrace their new lifestyle thrive and are mostly content. It is a big challenge for providers of aged care facilities to meet the expectations of residents and their families. I seek aged care facilities for my clients that suit their needs and will deliver quality service.

 

 

New Aged Care Facility in Greensborough

 

Trinity Manor Greensborough frontAs an aged care Placement Consultant I am, at times, invited to visit new aged care facilities prior to their opening. Recently I was invited to visit Trinity Manor Greensborough to view the facility before it opened its doors to residents yesterday (16th May, 2019).

Trinity Manor Greensborough reception

There are 112 beds, including 12 in the Memory Support section for those living with dementia needing a secure and safe environment.  They offer these residents a specialist dementia care support program. All residents have access to care by qualified registered division 1 nurses, available 24 hours.

The chef prepared a lovely lunch for me so that I could sample the standard of meals that will be served to the residents. They will have a plentiful supply of food throughout the  Trinity Manor Greensborough meal

day, with a continental and hot breakfast followed by a main meal at lunch with offerings such as Rogan Josh, roast leg of pork with apple sauce, crumbed fish and beef and shiraz pie served with a varied range of vegetables daily followed by desserts such as mango panna cotta and apple strudel. A soup is served in the evening followed by a light meal and dessert. Cakes, devonshire tea or biscuits are served at morning and afternoon tea and supper.

It was intriguing to see a robot in action in an aged care facility; its role is to take the load from carers and kitchen staff. Able to deliver to rooms and various departments, the robot accesses the lift to reach different floors.

Trinity Manor Greensborough robot 2

The robot stops when a resident is near and plays music as it goes along. In my role as a Placement Consultant I have to confess this is the first time I’ve seen a robot in aged care. The facility is using the Lamson Robo, which is easily operated with an IOS mobile app, allowing the operator to call and send the robot via a mobile device. Whilst I was visiting they were mapping the building with the robot. The new residents will be involved in naming the robot, with a competition for its name.

The facility has many great features, with a hairdresser,

Trinity Manor Greensborough haridresser

massage room, gymnasium, cinema,

 

private dining rooms for family meals, outdoor bar b q, multiple dining and lounge areas and balconies and terraces off rooms. The décor and furniture is all modern and tasteful.

Aged Care Service Not Age Friendly

elderly lady at home

Extraordinarily, Australia’s aged home care sector has come under some strong criticism for not being age friendly according to a report from the University of South Australia . Older Australians have been left feeling disempowered and lacking in confidence due to its complexities. Research explored the ability of people aged 65 plus to select and financially manage their home care packages;

“Home-care packages support people to stay in their own homes for longer, so they are a really appealing option for people as they age or become less independent,” said lead researcher, Braam Lowies “But our research found that older people felt insecure about their capacity to manage home-care packages to their best advantage and we wanted to understand why.”

What they found was that, although the government had recently increased total aged care spending to $662 million, including the release of 10,000 additional home-care packages, the environment in which the packages are provided was so complicated that many older Australians were unsure of which options best suit their personal situation.

Clients of mine are currently dealing with this very situation. A 96 year old couple are in need of support, having stayed independent until this year. The husband had a bad fall and is now in a rehabilitation unit and will probably need my help as a placement consultant to find accommodation in an aged care facility. However, his wife is keen to stay at home with support. She has found she needs help from her family to even begin the first step of applying for assistance. Without their support she would not be able to access the service on her own.

“We found a host of problems from a general lack of confidence and lack of knowledge of the system among older people, to overly complicated communications, high staff turnover and inadequately trained staff providing in home care, inconsistencies in package administration, confusing fee structures and even inaccurate billing processes” Dr Lowies said “Unfortunately, the more complicated and inaccessible the programs are, the more it creates a lack of confidence and motivation for older people accessing services.”

The banking and finance industry was also examined in the Financial Capability of Older People report and it came in for criticism too for not being age friendly.

 

Improving the Quality of Life for Residents in Aged Care

allity-templestowe-indpendent-living-manor

Many approaches are being tried in aged care facilities to improve the quality of life for residents. As a Placement Consultant I like to know that my clients will enjoy a contented and engaging life once they move into an aged care home, that not only will their physical needs be taken care of but their emotional, spiritual and intellectual needs too. Some fine examples of programs that help provide a good quality of life are discussed below:

Music therapist Heather Seyhun at ACH West Park Adelaide, brought in her own collection of drums from Africa and Brazil to begin a music trial she devised. Three months on, she says she’s amazed at how the group has evolved and the positive changes she has witnessed.

“When we started out, people were a bit unsure, because most had never hit a drum before, and felt outside their comfort zone,” she says. “Now they’re loving it, and they’re getting really good.”

Heather has seen improvements in wellbeing, socialisation, self-confidence and mobility. “You can see the enjoyment, the new friendships – playing music with others creates a special bond.” she says “Watching people with physical limitation participating, growing in confidence and supporting each other is so rewarding.”

A Zen Garden has been created at St. Patrick’s Green, Kogarah, NSW, based on the philosophy that a bit of nature is good for the soul and will allow residents to relax and meditate, among the sounds of a water feature and rustling palms.

Other wellbeing rooms are the Spa Room and Reflection Room. Residents can enjoy a soothing massage experience, complete with lavender essential oils, calming music, facials and other beauty treatments for a complete pamper experience.

The Reflection Room provides a tranquil space for residents to reflect on life, away from the bustle of communal areas. It also acts as a private space for residents to meet with the manager of Spiritual and Holistic Care if anything is troubling them.

Some therapies that research have found to be effective are:

Animals and pet therapy;Aromatherapy; Art therapy and craft; Behavioural activation and pleasant events; Bright light therapy; Cognitive behaviour therapy; Cognitive and memory skills interventions; Companion robot; Dance and movement;Dementia care mapping; Humour therapy; Laughter yoga; Life review; Life review therapy; Massage; Music and singing; Person-centred care; Restorative approaches; Simple reminiscence;Yoga.

More indepth information is available in the studyWhat works to promote emotional wellbeing in older people: A guide for aged care staff working in community or residential care settings. Melbourne: beyondblue by Wells, Y., Bhar, S., Kinsella, G., Kowalski, C., Merkes, M., Patchett, A., Salzmann, B., Teshuva, K., & van Holsteyn, J. (2014).

 

 

 

 

 

Montessori Method Helps Those Living With Dementia

7WaysMontessoriDementiaPatients

American Montessori expert Dr. Cameron Camp has developed a new approach to caring for persons living with dementia. This new approach is known as The Montessori Inspired Lifestyle ® (MIL). It is based on the philosophy and methods of Dr. Maria Montessori, the first female M.D. in Italy and world-renowned educator.

“Within this new paradigm, abilities, interests, and preferences will be respected, encouraged and maximized. Providing choice throughout the day is central to all interactions.” Said Dr. Camp “Central to MIL is the creation of meaningful activities and social roles within the context of a community. This helps to ensure that residents are engaged in life, have a feeling of belonging, have a sense of purpose, have access to meaningful activity, and can have a sense of control and independence.”

Having done a 3 week course with Omnicare Alliance to learn about Montessori and apply the principles and methods in her own home where she resides with her husband who lives with dementia, Susan was blown away by his progress.

“We have a bunch of signs around the house with cartoon pictures for Jim now that ask him questions. ‘Have you taken the bin out?’ or ‘Do you have your house keys?’ she explains “This actually gets him to think and engage with himself which is a big part of learning.” She has realised that if she communicates in a simple way with her husband he will understand and be able to help with chores. Rather than tell him to cut carrots into cubes, for example, she now models instructions, showing him how she wants them cut. He is then perfectly capable of carrying out her request.

The Montessori Method utilises simple, modifiable and practical tasks that utilise everyday items to re-engage individuals and help to retrain skills that may have diminished due to dementia. A person’s abilities are closely tied to their life experiences and passions, and identifying these passions and harnessing them to rekindle and engage a person is the essence of what makes Montessori training and learning effective. For instance, if a woman grew up playing the piano, music may be the key to her learning and engaging, but if she enjoyed gardening instead, then heading outdoors and incorporating seeds and plants into her activities, may be the key in helping her rediscover some old skills.

As an Aged Care Placement Consultant I would love to see this method used in more aged care facilities. With the current strong focus on the quality of care I hope providers are taking note of Dr. Camp’s new approach.