Sudden and Complex Decisions in Aged Care

Arcare Templestowe suite IMG_1692 (edited-Pixlr)

For people either planning for their future or who are at a stage where they need the support of an aged care facility in my role as a Placement Consultant I am often able to help with complex decisions and finding the right place that suits their particular needs.

For example, a couple I helped a few years back were planning for their future as they aged. They were selling their current home and considering moving into a retirement village, using the funds from the sale of their home. However, they were concerned that in the future one or both of them may need the higher level of care afforded in an aged care home and that they would not have enough funds left to buy into an aged care home that has the standard of living they enjoy.

They needed my servicesas they were confused by the vastly differing fees and charges, with inclusions that varied from village to village. I helped them by researching the different price ranges, exit strategies and cost of entering the next level of care. I felt the best solution whereby they could transition into aged care from retirement with the least disruption and loss of capital would be a retirement complex with aged care on site. I found the few facilities that offered this arrangement and set up visits for the couple to choose the option that suited them best geographically, cost wise and to their standard.

When a new aged care facility opened in Templestowe, Melbourne in April, 2019 I placed four of my clients there that year. They were all very happy with the single storey residence, and its lovely, large suites including double suites for couples. As a Placement Consultant, it has often been a challenge to meet my clients’ requests for a double suite as not many facilities catered to couples with shared room accommodation. Thankfully the new aged care facilities being built have rooms with couples’ accommodation, opening up the options.

Moving into aged care accommodation is often an emotional and stressful time for a person and their family, as they are suddenly in a situation where there has been a fall or deterioration to the point that immediate accommodation with high-level care must be found. They are often in hospital, waiting to be discharged and their needs are such high care they can only be supported safely in an aged care facility.

This is where I can offer my services as a Placement Consultant, helping on several levels. Firstly, I interview the client to find out what is important to them and what are priorities and, as I have a good knowledge of the accommodation available, can recommend a short list of the most suitable options. Secondly, I can help with negotiating fees, often saving my clients considerable amounts. Thirdly, I can fill out all the paper work and fourthly, I have counselling qualifications and can help ease the transition for all involved.

If you have a client or family member who needs help finding suitable aged care accommodation please contact me.

 

 

 

 

How Aged Care Facilities Respond to COVID-19

Racecourse Grange entrance

With the corona virus pandemic now in Australia there are changes to how aged care facilities are able to operate.

Trinity Manor Greensborough front

In my role as Placement Consultant I help clients find suitable accommodation in aged care facilities in Melbourne. I’m currently getting frequent updates from aged care facilities on changes to their protocols. Fortunately most aged care facilities still currently taking new residents and, in some cases, respite residents. There seems to be a general requirement for new residents to self isolate for 14 days when they move into their new home. However, the need for this varies from facility to facility, with some making it mandatory for all new intakes, whilst others have made it only for those who answer positively to questions about their symptoms and/or exposure to COVID-19 or carefully check on resident’s health upon intake.

I had a client recently who I had trouble placing into a facility as she was unable to do the 14 day isolation due to memory loss. Fortunately I was able to find another suitable facility whose policy is if a new resident comes from home they will have their temperature taken and be monitored. As my client was coming from home she was accepted. However, this facility requires new residents to self isolate for 14 days If coming directly from hospital. Some facilities can no longer accept people living with dementia or people that wander as they are unable to provide care for them with the social distancing restrictions now in place.

Restrictions around visitors also vary between aged care facilities with some putting in place a total ban for visitors, with some allowance when residents are in palliative care, and others allowing minimal visitors as per the government guidelines of no more than two at a time, once a day.

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Most visits to inspect facilities are now virtual with a range of sophistication there; some have film crews do a professional video tour whilst others film the facility themselves. Some facilities will meet with you and show photos and some will even allow a personal tour but with strict cleanliness and health protocols in place.

Greenview Donvale bed

It is challenging keeping up with all the different protocols in the various facilities and another reason my clients find my services so helpful  as I sift through these frequent updates to keep them informed.

 

 

 

 

This Year in The Aged Care Sector

Arcare Templestowe lounge

The year 2019 has been a very important one for the aged care sector. I am an Aged Care Placement Consultant and have shared many of the issues, developments and opinions that are helping to shape the future of aged care in Australia.

Developments in the treatment of dementia have featured quite prominently. In January the Specialist Dementia Care Program (SDCP) was beginning to roll out. Offering specialised, transitional residential support for people exhibiting very severe behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD), which focuses on reducing or stabilising symptoms over time, the program will provide care for those who are unable to be appropriately cared for by mainstream aged care services. The first specialist units are scheduled to be operational in 2020, with a further roll out in 2021-23.

Assistive technologieswere being developed through the year. One example is a prototype called DRESS to help people with dementia dress themselves. The carer initiates the dress sequence via a mobile device and the recorded voice prompts the person to dress themselves, correcting mistakes. Japan is heading to a workforce crisis in numbers with a rapidly aging population, so the government is encouraging the use of technology in aged care. An example is a robotic device that helps frail residents get out of bed and into a wheelchair or ease them into bathtubs.

And talking robots, I met my first robot in May this year, Lamson, when visiting a newly built aged care facility, Trinity Manor in Greensborough. It delivers medicine and meals, takes laundry and can even use lifts. Also, Griffith University has been using social robots to interact with people with dementia.

Ikkiworks has developed a robot called Ikki, who is a companion and a clinician and will eventually be used in aged care. Ikki can take a patient’s temperature and identify medication and alert the patient if the medication is incorrect.

Another approach to dementia care is the Montessori Inspired Lifestyle ® (MIL) developed by Dr. Cameron Camp. “Within this new paradigm, abilities, interests, and preferences will be respected, encouraged and maximized. Providing choice throughout the day is central to all interactions. Central to MIL is the creation of meaningful activities and social roles within the context of a community.” said Dr. Camp.

The aged care workforce was a subject that kept coming up, particularly the need for more nurses to be on call within facilities. I reported on an interesting study by Adelaide University published in April 2018 into the attraction and retention of staff to aged care. There were many reasons why working in the sector was attractive but the perception of this work as low level and underpaid was a negative.

In defence of the work Melanie Mazzarolli, Regional Business Manager, Residential Services at Benetas wrote in an article about the privilege of supporting someone on their journey to death, similar to supporting birth, and that relationships can be formed over long periods, rarely matched in other nursing roles. She also mentioned the passion of those employed in this sector. With the increase in the aging population more workers will be needed in the sector but finding and retaining them will be an ongoing challenge.

The Royal Commission into Aged Care was prevalent on the news for much of the year and painted a very negative picture of the sector. Clearly improvements across the sector are needed and a statement by the AMA this month spoke of using technologiesto assist meet the demands for care for the elderly. These technologies are already being developed and support for more development is needed.

Ending on a bright note the touching and beautifully produced documentary series The Old People’s Home for 4 Year Olds aired on ABC in August and September took a look at an experiment in an intergenerational program. This experiment is the first of its kind conducted in Australia with structured activities used to encourage interactions between the children and adults as they worked together to achieve particular goals. Health measurements were taken before and after the program and showed positive outcomes. Professor Susan Kurrle, who oversaw the program, believes the implications of this successful trial could be huge.

I look forward to a more positive focus on aged care in 2020, with improvements and developments that will assist the sector to deliver a high level of quality care to all our older residents.

New Aged Care Facility Sparkles in Templestowe

 

Arcare Templestowe lounge

A delightful new aged care facility opened in Templestowe, Melbourne earlier this year. Its official opening date was April 4th. I have since placed four of my clients there, who are very happy with the facility. It is a single storey residence, has lovely, large suites including double suites for couples.

Arcare Templestowe suite IMG_1692 (edited-Pixlr)

This is good news for me because, as a Placement Consultant, I often have requests from couples for a double suite and, in the past, it has been hard to place couples in suitable aged care accommodation where they can share a room. Thankfully we can see in the new facilities being built there is more awareness of the need for couples’ accommodation.

IMG_1670 (edited-Pixlr)

 

Intimate dining and lounge areas create a cosy feel for residents and there is a separate dining room where residents can invite their families for a meal. A boutique café caters for casual snacks and drinks through the day and food is cooked fresh daily for meals. There is 24/7 nursing care for all residents.

Feeling good about yourself is important and the hair dressing salon onsite ensures residents can have a bit of pampering and lovey hair styles. Entertainment is at hand with a good sized billiards table, movie room and a wide range of activities and outings.

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During the year residents visited the Heide Museum of Modern Art at Bulleen and Montsaalvat in Eltham where one of the residents commented on how the building was constructed in the 1930s by its then residents, mainly out of recycled materials.

arcare templestow montsalvat

Picture from Arcare Templestowe website.

Lifestyle coordinator Noelene said, “It important that our clients to come out on these bus trips, as they enable the clients to feel connected to the community and encourage the clients to socialise with each other. It always so interesting to hear the conversations that come from our outings; the clients have so many quirky stories, history and knowledge that come out.”

Arcare Templestowe also incorporates The Marsden sensitive care unit, a secure area which specifically cares for clients who are living with progressed dementia or Alzheimer’s disease.

I have over twenty year’s experience in aged careand a good knowledge of the facilities available in Melbourne and surrounds. If your client or family member needs support in finding the most suitable facility please contact me.

 

When You Must Find An Aged Care Facility

Benetas Hedelberg jpgMost elderly people would prefer to stay in their own home, living independently and the government is currently grappling to provide the level of support that will allow as many people as possible to live safely at home. The long wait times and, in some cases, inadequate service providers have been highlighted in the Royal Commission into Aged Care. As associate tells me of her 97 year old Aunty with mild dementia and some memory loss, but bright in spirit and determined to stay at home alone since losing her husband this year who has a nine month wait for a package. At that age it is debateable whether she will live long enough to receive the support she deserves.

So, apart from the problems of delivering the level of care needed to help people stay in their own homes the reality is there are people whose needs are such high care they can only be supported safely in an aged care facility. These are the people I assist when they need to find suitable accommodation with the level of care needed. It is often an emotional and stressful time for a person and their family as they are suddenly in a situation where there has been a fall or deterioration to the point that immediate accommodation with high-level care must be found.

The pathway is usually that the person has been hospitalised and once their immediate injuries are resolved the hospital needs to discharge them to suitable care. It is assessed that they are not able to be looked after adequately in their home and so an aged care facility must be found as soon as possible.

This places a great deal of stress on the family and the elderly person is often disorientated and grieving at leaving their family home. I help families and their loved one to find suitable aged care accommodation by interviewing them to be clear on their needs and wants and then finding appropriate accommodation options for them to choose from. Some of the more regular requests are: a facility located close enough to the family so they can visit frequently, somewhere that has a good activities program, a double suite for a couple to share, good quality food, nice outlook and garden surrounds and, ofcourse, caring staff. Because I know many of the Managers in the aged care sector and am familiar with the facilities I am in a position to recommend suitable options.

It makes me happy to find a place that makes my clients happy. I received two testimonials recently I would like to share with you:

“Making the decision to have Jillian as our Placement Consultant was like finding a ‘pot of gold’.  From the first phone call we felt a sense of relief as she was very reassuring and caring.Jillian helped our family situation enormously. We highly recommend her services, very efficient, excellent negotiation skills, first-rate knowledge of the aged care homes and the complex aged care system”

Gail and Andrea  2019

“I couldn’t have done any of this without you. You have been wonderful”

Barry, Albert Park 2019

You’ll find more lovely testimonials on my website.

Aged Care Residents’ Communications In The Digital Age

elderly-smartphone

Older adults may be slower in their uptake of internet based technologies, but they are more digitally connected than ever. Tweeting, facetiming and face booking are all popular ways to keep in touch with family, grand kids and friends. As social media has become an ever increasingly important platform for social connections older people are using the medium  more often.

Active social engagement has been shown to be associated with better health and health outcomes across a number of studies over many years. When a person moves into an aged care facility it may be difficult for them to continue their social connections in the physical sense. They may be some distance away from the neighbourhood in which they have lived, they may be unable to travel to maintain relationships. Family visits then become more important, providing social contact and support but geographic distance or work commitments may hinder their ability to make frequent visits.

The possibilities of digital connection to the wider world offer an important avenue for further social connectedness, including connections with family and friends overseas. Aged care facilities are now getting on-board with most providing wifi access to residents. As a Placement Consultant for aged care accommodation, I always check whether wifi is available when sourcing appropriate aged care accommodation as it has become a highly desired criteria, with families asking for wifi. Not all residents wish to take up new technologies, but their families often bring devices when visiting to connect to other family members or friends.

Access to online resources can enhance the well-being of older adults through more frequent social interactions and better access to information. As reported in the Journal of Ageing and Mental Health a small study was done on a group of 80 year old men, with one group learning computer skills and having internet access whilst the control group did other activities. The study found that “Computer and Internet use seems to contribute to older adults’ well-being and sense of empowerment by affecting their interpersonal interactions, promoting their cognitive functioning and contributing to their experience of control and independence.”

The Rise of Robots in Aged Care

Robots in care

The rise of technology has led to it being used increasingly in health and aged care settings. Infra-red vein finders, nurse-specific smart devices and various monitoring tools are being introduced on wards whilst Skype and iPads and other devices are helping to keep families connected to loved ones who are in aged care. And across the world we are seeing the rise of robots in care.

Lamson, a robot currently being used in residential care in Melbourne, delivers medicine and meals, takes laundry and can even use lifts. I met this robot recently when visiting a newly built aged care facility, Trinity Manor,in Greensborough that opened its doors to residents in May this year. As a Placement Consultant, helping find suitable aged care for clients, I have the privilege of visiting new aged care facilities to assess their suitability for my clientele and I have to confess this was the first time I had seen such a robot in action.

These robots will become more common. The latest innovation are telepresence robots which are controlled by a remote user, in the case of Lamson it was staff, but many used in other places are actually controlled by family members of the resident. A study of these robots in Finland found that for the elderly, telepresence provides benefits over non-mobile video connections as they can interact with it in a more natural manner. The robots also help the elderly to feel secure, as they feel that their relatives or carers can keep an eye on them virtually and interact with them.

Griffith University has been using social robots to interact with people with dementia, and a new start-up out of Sydney has been experimenting with robots that can help patients take their medicine.

Ikkiworks’ new robot, ikki, is part companion, part clinician. Trialled primarily with children living with cancer, ikki can take the temperature of a patient, as well as identify medication and alert the patient if the medication is incorrect. What a boon that would be for elderly people that forget to take their medication. Ikkiworks plan to develop the robot so it could eventually be used in aged care, providing companionship whilst monitoring health.

Wendy Moyle from Griffith University sees the next innovation in robot technology being the development of assistive robots integrated with smart homes, assisting elderly adults to stay home longer.“These are multifunctional robots that are voice activated, can assist a person with activities of daily living, monitor wellbeing and report wellbeing to healthcare professionals and family and can virtually connect the person.” she said.

We are certainly living in the technological age and it’s encouraging to see how these developing technologies can help our ever growing aged population to enjoy better care.

Participants Can Register Online for Dementia Studies

Interesting face

Were you aware that dementia is the second leading cause of death in Australia? More research is needed to better understand this insidious disease and its effects upon an ageing population. However, finding willing people for trials and research can be difficult for academics with a preliminary review of the Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry finding that of terminated dementia clinical trials, three in five ceased due to recruitment difficulties.

Now a new website has been developed that matches participants and researchers. Using a similar approach as dating apps participants are matched to researchers based on features that academics need for their studies, such as age, location and diagnosis. The site is called Stepup for Dementia Research. Its program director is Yun-Hee Jeon.

Jeon has seen trials fail first hand and believes that the stigma surrounding dementia is hindering recruitment, hurting those who need help the most.“In my own experience I have seen trials delayed by over a year and budgets blown out due to an inability to find the right research participants. StepUp for Dementia Research is set to change this,” she said.

StepUp for Dementia Research is supported by funding from the Australian Government Department of Health under the Dementia and Aged Care Services Fund. It is delivered by the University of Sydney and was developed in partnership with the University of Exeter and University College London.

When researchers register their studies, they define the kind of people they’re looking for and the StepUp for Dementia Research system matches that description to the information provided by registered volunteers. Researchers can only see participants’ details that match their criteria. If they deem a registered participant is suitable they will contact them direct to explain the research and ask if they would like to participate.

Anyone over the age of 18 can register, whether living with dementia or not. Health and aged care providers are encouraged to refer suitable people to the website and a range of promotional materials, such as brochures and posters will soon be distributed by Sydney University.

Jane Thompson was a carer for her husband Alan who had Alzheimer’s. She found the experience very challenging and difficult and now advocates for more research into dementia. She said “I would really encourage people to participate in research studies – and also to consider contributing to the research process more broadly to help ensure that the focus is on areas most likely to impact the lives of whom the research is about.”

For more information call 1800 – STEP – 123 (1800-7837-123) or email stepup.research@sydney.edu.au or visit the website.

 

Thanks to Aged Care Insite.  Listen to their interview with Yun-Hee Jeon.

Meeting Residents’ Expectations in Aged Care Homes

As an Aged Care Placement Consultant I find  clients always ask me about two main issues. The first is staff ratios, which has become a hot topic in aged care. This is a difficult question to answer since the introduction of Ageing In Place, because most Aged Care Homes now have a mixture of high and low needs and staff numbers are rostered according to care needs and work load at any given time. I find the most helpful question to ask of an aged care facility is the availability of Registered Nurses on each shift, including overnight, as well as the availability of Doctors on weekends and overnight.

The second most often asked question is about the quality of food, which is another big issue in aged care homes.  I can understand why it’s so important. Apart from the nutritional value, food plays a major role in the daily life of a resident. The anticipation of meals is an important focus and having a good feed leaves them satisfied. Everyone enters a home anticipating the food will be up to standard and palatable; some are disappointed at the quality, while others find the meals delicious.

Earlier in my career when I worked in Aged Care Facilities I was amused that it was often the people who had lived alone surviving on toast or crumpets who complained the most about the food. I would hear the complaints the Chef received and they were often contradictory, some thought the soup too hot, some too cold, some found the gravy too thick, some too thin. I realised how difficult it was to deliver meals for such a large and diverse population, also taking into account medical conditions, and still please everyone. I can assure you there are many residents who do enjoy their food.

In my experience, the people who choose to enter residential aged care and embrace their new lifestyle thrive and are mostly content. It is a big challenge for providers of aged care facilities to meet the expectations of residents and their families. I seek aged care facilities for my clients that suit their needs and will deliver quality service.

 

 

New Aged Care Facility in Greensborough

 

Trinity Manor Greensborough frontAs an aged care Placement Consultant I am, at times, invited to visit new aged care facilities prior to their opening. Recently I was invited to visit Trinity Manor Greensborough to view the facility before it opened its doors to residents yesterday (16th May, 2019).

Trinity Manor Greensborough reception

There are 112 beds, including 12 in the Memory Support section for those living with dementia needing a secure and safe environment.  They offer these residents a specialist dementia care support program. All residents have access to care by qualified registered division 1 nurses, available 24 hours.

The chef prepared a lovely lunch for me so that I could sample the standard of meals that will be served to the residents. They will have a plentiful supply of food throughout the  Trinity Manor Greensborough meal

day, with a continental and hot breakfast followed by a main meal at lunch with offerings such as Rogan Josh, roast leg of pork with apple sauce, crumbed fish and beef and shiraz pie served with a varied range of vegetables daily followed by desserts such as mango panna cotta and apple strudel. A soup is served in the evening followed by a light meal and dessert. Cakes, devonshire tea or biscuits are served at morning and afternoon tea and supper.

It was intriguing to see a robot in action in an aged care facility; its role is to take the load from carers and kitchen staff. Able to deliver to rooms and various departments, the robot accesses the lift to reach different floors.

Trinity Manor Greensborough robot 2

The robot stops when a resident is near and plays music as it goes along. In my role as a Placement Consultant I have to confess this is the first time I’ve seen a robot in aged care. The facility is using the Lamson Robo, which is easily operated with an IOS mobile app, allowing the operator to call and send the robot via a mobile device. Whilst I was visiting they were mapping the building with the robot. The new residents will be involved in naming the robot, with a competition for its name.

The facility has many great features, with a hairdresser,

Trinity Manor Greensborough haridresser

massage room, gymnasium, cinema,

 

private dining rooms for family meals, outdoor bar b q, multiple dining and lounge areas and balconies and terraces off rooms. The décor and furniture is all modern and tasteful.