Relationship Centred Dementia Care Online Presentation

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The Dementia Australia National Symposium Series 2020 – Dementia care is quality  was delivered as an online series of six weekly virtual events, commencing 4 August. It had originally been intended to be delivered as an in person event in Sydney.

Dementia Australia CEO Maree McCabe said about the series “Offering the webinar series for free is our contribution to supporting the aged care sector through this difficult time to enable a greater level of engagement than would have been possible with the original event.”

Hospital, hotel or home? What does relationship-centred quality look like and how do you know you’re delivering it? was presented by Dr Lisa Trigg, Assistant Director of Research, Data and Intelligence at Social Care Wales (UK), on 25 August.

“A relationship-centred approach to quality is the best type of quality, where the person needing care is treated as an individual with his or her own personality, regardless of their health issues,” Dr Trigg said.

“It is being cared for by someone in a compassionate and supportive reciprocal relationship – even though someone may be in the late stages of dementia, they are still a person with their own individuality and personality.”

Dr Trigg has studied quality improvement in long-term care and currently supports people working in care in Wales with evidence and research to inform policy and service design. At the symposium she explained the concept of relationship-centred quality and gave delegates the opportunity to reflect upon the quality of care in their own organisation and how well it is being achieved.

Relationship centred care focuses on enhancing the care experience for residents together with family and staff, where relationships between them are built upon and nurtured. Residents feel a sense of security, feeling safe and receiving knowledgeable and sensitive care whilst staff feel safe from threat, working within a supportive culture and families are supported to feel confident in providing good care. A sense of belonging is established, residents are supported to make friends within the setting, family maintain valued relationships and staff feel like they are part of a team.

Residents have the opportunity to develop and meet goals, giving them a sense of achievement, which is shared with family and staff. A sense of continuity is built with residents receiving care from staff they know and staff have consistent work assignments. A shared sense of purpose is also achieved with the help of family in activities where residents have meaningful, purposeful functions and staff help with clear, shared goals. Importantly, residents feel valued and recognised, staff feel like their work matters and family feel valued by staff.

You can tune into the last two webinars in the webinar series:

Tuesday 1 September at 4pm Reconsidering Person-Centred Dementia Care: Can we make this an everyday experience for those living with high dependency needs and dementia? Presented by Professor Dawn Broker

Tuesday 8 September at 11 am Leadership and the Challenge of Change by Ita Buttrose AC OBE and Addressing Leadership Blind Spots to Staff Engagement by Dr James Adonis

Dementia Advocate closing by Keith Davies.

Jillian Slade is a Placement Consultant.

 

Aged Care Minister Colbek’s Response to Covid 19

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On Friday 22nd August the Senate Select Committee on COVID-19 in Aged Care Facilities interviewed the Aged Care Minister, Minister Colbek, for the second time.

He began well by thanking all workers in aged care facilities – personal carers, nurses, cleaners and cooks. He stated that they deal with confronting situations, that they can be scared for their own health but continue to turn up to work.

He said “We need them. They are at times unfairly scrutinised.” He went on to claim that the government …” can always do better.We will continue to work to be prepared to have resources as best we can, particularly to support the Victorian government to get the community transition under control.”

Then he stumbled. As he was being questioned about whether his department was doing its job protecting the elderly from COVID-19 in federally funded and regulated nursing homes the Senator was unable to answer how many residents had died in Victorian aged care facilities and how many current active cases there were.

Eventually a staff member told the inquiry that as of 8:00am on Thursday, 20 August 254 residents in aged care facilities had died due to Covid-19, there were 1811 active cases, with 239 recovered.

According to Anne Connelly of the ABC in her report today the Prime Minister claimed in Parliament Question Time on Monday (24th August) that of the 126 nursing homes affected by Corona Virus in Victoria only 16 have experienced a “significant” impact from COVID-19; four have had a “severe” impact and, as of yesterday morning, the number that have been “significantly impacted has been reduced to three”.

She also reported that Prime Minister Morrison and Aged Care Minister Colbeck spent yesterday’s Question Time arguing that the many plans, emails, guidelines and webinars which were sent to the aged care sector equated to effective preparation and that high levels of community transmission were to blame.

This was obviously in response to the question on Friday in the Senate Hearing where Minister Colbeck was quizzed about what support the federal government gave the aged care sector to help it prepare prior to the community spread of the Corona Virus outbreak.

Minister Colbeck mentioned at the hearing that the federal government were spending $171M for the aged care response to Covid-19 and they had set up a Disability Response centre in Victoria with $15M in funding split between the federal government and Victorian government.

The lives of those most vulnerable in aged care facilities must be given the respect and care they deserve. Ensuring the aged care providers have sufficient information, easy to follow guidelines, staffing support and adequate protective equipment is the job of the government. Both State and Federal governments have a critical role to play and they must work together in harmony to protect the elderly under their umbrella of care.

Jillian Slade is a Placement Consultant for aged care.