Montessori Method Helps Those Living With Dementia

7WaysMontessoriDementiaPatients

American Montessori expert Dr. Cameron Camp has developed a new approach to caring for persons living with dementia. This new approach is known as The Montessori Inspired Lifestyle ® (MIL). It is based on the philosophy and methods of Dr. Maria Montessori, the first female M.D. in Italy and world-renowned educator.

“Within this new paradigm, abilities, interests, and preferences will be respected, encouraged and maximized. Providing choice throughout the day is central to all interactions.” Said Dr. Camp “Central to MIL is the creation of meaningful activities and social roles within the context of a community. This helps to ensure that residents are engaged in life, have a feeling of belonging, have a sense of purpose, have access to meaningful activity, and can have a sense of control and independence.”

Having done a 3 week course with Omnicare Alliance to learn about Montessori and apply the principles and methods in her own home where she resides with her husband who lives with dementia, Susan was blown away by his progress.

“We have a bunch of signs around the house with cartoon pictures for Jim now that ask him questions. ‘Have you taken the bin out?’ or ‘Do you have your house keys?’ she explains “This actually gets him to think and engage with himself which is a big part of learning.” She has realised that if she communicates in a simple way with her husband he will understand and be able to help with chores. Rather than tell him to cut carrots into cubes, for example, she now models instructions, showing him how she wants them cut. He is then perfectly capable of carrying out her request.

The Montessori Method utilises simple, modifiable and practical tasks that utilise everyday items to re-engage individuals and help to retrain skills that may have diminished due to dementia. A person’s abilities are closely tied to their life experiences and passions, and identifying these passions and harnessing them to rekindle and engage a person is the essence of what makes Montessori training and learning effective. For instance, if a woman grew up playing the piano, music may be the key to her learning and engaging, but if she enjoyed gardening instead, then heading outdoors and incorporating seeds and plants into her activities, may be the key in helping her rediscover some old skills.

As an Aged Care Placement Consultant I would love to see this method used in more aged care facilities. With the current strong focus on the quality of care I hope providers are taking note of Dr. Camp’s new approach.

 

 

The Ins and Outs of Dementia

 

Interesting face

Dementia in Australia has some worrying statistics, such as it being the leading cause of death among Australian women and the third most common cause of death among men, it is estimated to cost Australia more than $15 billion this year and by 2025 the total cost of dementia is predicted to increase to more than $18.7 billion.

The brain controls everything we do and generates instructions to our body, as well as facilitating our complex behaviours, such as personality and cognition (our ability to think, understand and do things). When a person has dementia, neurons in various parts of their brain stop communicating properly, disconnect, and gradually die.

Dementia is caused by progressive neurodegenerative diseases, with the disease starting in one part of the brain and spreading to other parts, affecting more and more functions in the body. Dementia is caused by different diseases and depending on the cause different parts of the brain will be affected, resulting in differing symptoms depending on the part of the brain being affected. Memory loss is often associated with dementia and it is one of the most common symptoms and usually the first symptom people notice. When neurons in the part of the brain called the hippocampus degenerate and die memory loss is experienced.

Dementia is not caused by old age but ageing is a high risk factor for the condition. When the frontal cortex of the brain is affected by dementia behaviours will change and often socially unacceptable behaviour is exhibited.

These symptoms often mean that people with dementia will require care in an aged care facility where they will be safe. The care of residents with dementia has often been challenging but new ways of caring are being developed to enable those residents to have a better quality of life. Construction has just begun on Korongee, a new concept dementia village in Glenorchy, Tasmania. The design of Korongee is based on a typical Tasmanian cul-de-sac, and is intended to encourage people living with dementia to continue to take part in normal, everyday activities. Households with eight bedrooms set in the village and a café, supermarket, beauty salon and gardens will all create a delightful, safe living space.

When I have clients living with dementia who need to find  suitable aged care accommodation I search for facilities that have  innovative programs to care for their needs and I would love to see a village like Korongee built in Melbourne.

 

 

New Concept For Dementia Aged Care Residence

Artist’s impression Korongee Village

The Netherlands are leaders in innovation in aged care and the dementia village, De Hogeweyk, based there is to be the model for a new residential facility being constructed in Hobart.  The Korongee dementia village in Glenorchy, Hobart will be designed to recreate real-life experiences for people with dementia. The fifteen six-bedroom homes will be set within a small town featuring streets, a supermarket, cinema, café and gardens, with residents wandering freely within a safe and supported environment.

The residents of De Hoeweyk dementia village live longer, eat better and take less medication and it is hoped the same health benefits will be seen in residents at this new Australian facility. The environment within the houses will be more relaxed, with casually-dressed health professionals and residents free to wake up and move about in their own time, free of institutional routines. Residents will live alongside people of like backgrounds, experiences, interests and skills.

A New Zealand aged care provider is also looking at developing a village based on the Hogeweyk design.  They have engaged Aged care specialists Ansell Strategic to undertake a feasibility study for the development of a dementia village in Invercargill. Funding systems and staff-to-resident ratios are among key challenges with the Netherlands model using two carers per resident.  “New Zealand has a similar mixed aged care funding model to Australia, where residents and the government both contribute to the cost of care, said Rosie O’Dowd, assistant analyst “Comparatively, the Netherlands operates under a more tax-financed system, allowing for residential aged care models to be developed based on optimal community modelling rather than a focus on efficiency, scale or aesthetics.”

Korongee village is a partnership between not-for-profit aged care provider Glenview, industry superannuation fund HESTA, social financing organisation Social Ventures Australia (SVA) and the Commonwealth Government. Only many levels, this is the way of the future in Aged Care provision.

As an Aged Care Placement Consultant I await, with great optimism, the opening of this new concept in dementia care in 2019.