Greater Transparency About Aged Care Facilities Leads to Consumer Empowerment

It seems that aged care provision is at a cross roads. An article in a series on aged care published in the Sydney Morning Herald in September looked at deregulation. According to the article National President of Dementia Australia, Graeme Samuel says he is “very much in favour” of deregulating the aged care system. He believes that only consumer empowerment will improve it. He says that before this can be achieved the government’s accreditation agency must make some changes, such as introducing more rigorous standards in their accreditation system and the government should allow the Aged Care Complaints Commissioner to have the power to publish the names of aged care facilities that have complaints upheld against them. Drawing from his experience as the former head of the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission he stated “It’s so obvious. When you start doing that, the consumers are empowered and they’re only ever empowered by transparency and accountability, which was the fundamental mantra of what we did at ACCC.”

Another of Mr. Samuel’s concerns was the lack of hard information to allow elderly people to make sound choices when they select an aged care facility. “People are bombarded with marketing information, whether it’s accurate or not. It’s all huff and puff.”  He claims that selections are made based on this marketing and once they are in the facility and find out it’s not suitable they can’t change easily. Aged Care Minister Ken Wyatt acknowledges the problem, saying “I accept that with consumer-directed care what you have to make available is the information relevant to each facility … we should be transparent … and I acknowledge that we don’t do that with aged care.”

As an Aged Care Placement Consultant I am in a position to have access to a lot more information about aged care facilities than most consumers are able to know.  That is the reason I am able to help people to find a facility that suits their particular needs, the depth of knowledge I have of each facility and also the ability to properly assess their needs and wants for their future home.  However, I am in agreement with Mr. Samuel that there needs to be much greater transparency and accountability within this sector to enable elderly people to make a sound selection.  I know, perhaps better than most, how important it is for someone going into an aged care home to get it right. After all, this is their home for the rest of their lives.