Funding to Help Forgotten Australians

aimee-vogelsang-DbJR10fEteE-unsplash-1Forgotten Australians, also known as Care Leavers, are people who were in an orphanage or other institution while a child up until 1989 and experienced either horrendous physical or sexual abuse, or bad care practices. More than 500,000 Australians endured poor living conditions as an institutionalised child. In recognition of their needs $500,000 in funding was provided by the former Minister for Aged Care, Mr Ken Wyatt to South Australian not-for-profit organisation, Helping Hand Aged Care, to develop their guide Real Care The Second Time Around.

Helping Hands believes the funding they have received from the Government will allow for communication and understanding between aged care providers and Forgotten Australians.

Helping Hand Project Manager Diana O’Neil said.“We are hopeful this booklet is the first step in a longer conversation that will lead to influencing policy and practices within the aged care sector.” The guide was released by Helping Hands in February, and recognises choice and control is important but a challenge to Forgotten Australians. Some of the suggestions in the guide include offering care based on choice, transparency and understanding.

To accompany the work from Helping Hand, Flinders University has begun research into the needs of Forgotten Australians to create tangible recommendations for aged care facilities.

Flinders University’s College of Medicine and Public Health recently acquired a $50,000 Strategic Research Grant from the Australian Association of Gerontology and the Flinders Foundation, to explore the health impacts, needs, preferences, barriers and experiences of the Forgotten Australians moving into aged care or accessing aged care services.

Monica Cations, Flinders University Research fellow and Chief Investigator of the Forgotten Australians study, will be leading the study with the findings and recommendations to be released next year in March/April.

Ms Cations says, “Aged care is really terrifying for people that were raised in these types of environments. The concept of being re-institutionalised is terrifying for a lot of people. We need to understand and explore what are the other options. Because a lot of aspects of general aged care can be really unsafe for people who have experienced traumatic childhoods or institutionalisation as children. But we don’t know a lot about what exactly needs to change to meet their needs.”

Forgotten Australians from South Australia will be interviewed to develop recommendations for aged care facilities to implement. The research team report they were overwhelmed by the amount of Forgotten Australians wanting to participate.

Thanks to the Aged Care Guide website.

The Rise of Robots in Aged Care

Robots in care

The rise of technology has led to it being used increasingly in health and aged care settings. Infra-red vein finders, nurse-specific smart devices and various monitoring tools are being introduced on wards whilst Skype and iPads and other devices are helping to keep families connected to loved ones who are in aged care. And across the world we are seeing the rise of robots in care.

Lamson, a robot currently being used in residential care in Melbourne, delivers medicine and meals, takes laundry and can even use lifts. I met this robot recently when visiting a newly built aged care facility, Trinity Manor,in Greensborough that opened its doors to residents in May this year. As a Placement Consultant, helping find suitable aged care for clients, I have the privilege of visiting new aged care facilities to assess their suitability for my clientele and I have to confess this was the first time I had seen such a robot in action.

These robots will become more common. The latest innovation are telepresence robots which are controlled by a remote user, in the case of Lamson it was staff, but many used in other places are actually controlled by family members of the resident. A study of these robots in Finland found that for the elderly, telepresence provides benefits over non-mobile video connections as they can interact with it in a more natural manner. The robots also help the elderly to feel secure, as they feel that their relatives or carers can keep an eye on them virtually and interact with them.

Griffith University has been using social robots to interact with people with dementia, and a new start-up out of Sydney has been experimenting with robots that can help patients take their medicine.

Ikkiworks’ new robot, ikki, is part companion, part clinician. Trialled primarily with children living with cancer, ikki can take the temperature of a patient, as well as identify medication and alert the patient if the medication is incorrect. What a boon that would be for elderly people that forget to take their medication. Ikkiworks plan to develop the robot so it could eventually be used in aged care, providing companionship whilst monitoring health.

Wendy Moyle from Griffith University sees the next innovation in robot technology being the development of assistive robots integrated with smart homes, assisting elderly adults to stay home longer.“These are multifunctional robots that are voice activated, can assist a person with activities of daily living, monitor wellbeing and report wellbeing to healthcare professionals and family and can virtually connect the person.” she said.

We are certainly living in the technological age and it’s encouraging to see how these developing technologies can help our ever growing aged population to enjoy better care.

Meeting Residents’ Expectations in Aged Care Homes

As an Aged Care Placement Consultant I find  clients always ask me about two main issues. The first is staff ratios, which has become a hot topic in aged care. This is a difficult question to answer since the introduction of Ageing In Place, because most Aged Care Homes now have a mixture of high and low needs and staff numbers are rostered according to care needs and work load at any given time. I find the most helpful question to ask of an aged care facility is the availability of Registered Nurses on each shift, including overnight, as well as the availability of Doctors on weekends and overnight.

The second most often asked question is about the quality of food, which is another big issue in aged care homes.  I can understand why it’s so important. Apart from the nutritional value, food plays a major role in the daily life of a resident. The anticipation of meals is an important focus and having a good feed leaves them satisfied. Everyone enters a home anticipating the food will be up to standard and palatable; some are disappointed at the quality, while others find the meals delicious.

Earlier in my career when I worked in Aged Care Facilities I was amused that it was often the people who had lived alone surviving on toast or crumpets who complained the most about the food. I would hear the complaints the Chef received and they were often contradictory, some thought the soup too hot, some too cold, some found the gravy too thick, some too thin. I realised how difficult it was to deliver meals for such a large and diverse population, also taking into account medical conditions, and still please everyone. I can assure you there are many residents who do enjoy their food.

In my experience, the people who choose to enter residential aged care and embrace their new lifestyle thrive and are mostly content. It is a big challenge for providers of aged care facilities to meet the expectations of residents and their families. I seek aged care facilities for my clients that suit their needs and will deliver quality service.

 

 

New Aged Care Facility in Greensborough

 

Trinity Manor Greensborough frontAs an aged care Placement Consultant I am, at times, invited to visit new aged care facilities prior to their opening. Recently I was invited to visit Trinity Manor Greensborough to view the facility before it opened its doors to residents yesterday (16th May, 2019).

Trinity Manor Greensborough reception

There are 112 beds, including 12 in the Memory Support section for those living with dementia needing a secure and safe environment.  They offer these residents a specialist dementia care support program. All residents have access to care by qualified registered division 1 nurses, available 24 hours.

The chef prepared a lovely lunch for me so that I could sample the standard of meals that will be served to the residents. They will have a plentiful supply of food throughout the  Trinity Manor Greensborough meal

day, with a continental and hot breakfast followed by a main meal at lunch with offerings such as Rogan Josh, roast leg of pork with apple sauce, crumbed fish and beef and shiraz pie served with a varied range of vegetables daily followed by desserts such as mango panna cotta and apple strudel. A soup is served in the evening followed by a light meal and dessert. Cakes, devonshire tea or biscuits are served at morning and afternoon tea and supper.

It was intriguing to see a robot in action in an aged care facility; its role is to take the load from carers and kitchen staff. Able to deliver to rooms and various departments, the robot accesses the lift to reach different floors.

Trinity Manor Greensborough robot 2

The robot stops when a resident is near and plays music as it goes along. In my role as a Placement Consultant I have to confess this is the first time I’ve seen a robot in aged care. The facility is using the Lamson Robo, which is easily operated with an IOS mobile app, allowing the operator to call and send the robot via a mobile device. Whilst I was visiting they were mapping the building with the robot. The new residents will be involved in naming the robot, with a competition for its name.

The facility has many great features, with a hairdresser,

Trinity Manor Greensborough haridresser

massage room, gymnasium, cinema,

 

private dining rooms for family meals, outdoor bar b q, multiple dining and lounge areas and balconies and terraces off rooms. The décor and furniture is all modern and tasteful.

The Benefit of Pets in Aged Care Homes

The Animal Welfare League of Australia has undertaken a survey of aged care facilities and so far 90% of respondents to the survey have stated that having pets at the facilities is either very or vitally important for residents. As I source appropriate aged care facilities for my clients I sometimes receive requests for pet friendly aged care homes and found this report very relevant.

Directors of successful pet–friendly aged care facilities report that pets contribute to community feeling, encouraging friendships between residents. One of the benefits to the pet owner is the social interaction with other residents and staff as they stop to introduce their pet.

The Directors say that complaints about pets have been minimal where clear guidelines were adopted and expert community volunteers have provided the needed support and advice to pet owners. The overall benefits to residents who are bonded to their pets when they can reside with them in the aged care facility should not be underestimated states the AWLA. Residents who have a strong bond with their pet and are unable to have them stay experience profound grief, which is layered on their sense of sadness and loss when adjusting to moving from their own home into an aged care facility.

Studies on pet ownership have shown very positive outcomes. Researchers in a US study conducted in 2011 found that pet owners experienced greater self-esteem, had healthier personalities, were less fearful, depressed or lonely and were happier than people without pets whilst a German/Australian study in 2017 found that pet owners were physically healthier than those who did not currently own a pet. Some of the health benefits proven for pet owners are lower blood pressure, lower stress and better survival after a heart attack. Compelling reasons for residents in aged care facilities to keep their pets.

 

 

 

 

Jillian Slade Case Studies For Suitable Aged Care Accommodation

Jillian Slade with a happy client.

Looking back on some Case Studies of clients I have been able to successfully place in suitable aged care facilities I am so pleased I was able to help these families. I recall the story of two desperate brothers who were under pressure to move their father into aged care within a week! The brothers had found facilities that were close to them were either too expensive, charged additional service fees, were too depressing or had long waiting lists. Both worked full time and were exhausted from searching. I was able to arrange a tour of 5 facilities which met their criteria and when they favoured one I spoke with my contact there about the urgency; within days they had chosen a room and their father settled in very well.

Another situation concerned a couple who were going along quite well in their own home with the husband as main carer for his wife, who was in the early stages of dementia. Then he had a serious fall resulting in a head injury which left him unable to walk again. The family now needed to find him a place in residential care quickly. They were introduced to me as a Placement Consultant and my brief was to find an aged care facility they could afford, be accommodated together as a couple and move in at the same time.  Not an easy ask in Bayside Melbourne! I secured them a place in a lovely facility where they had a couple’s suite and I was able to negotiate an affordable price.

Two sisters who received a nasty shock when told by medical staff that their father’s condition  made it dangerous for him to go back home and live alone came to me for help to find permanent aged care accommodation for him. He had been living alone but began to have falls due to sudden drops in blood pressure and ended up in hospital after a major fall. The daughters had visited what they thought were all the available facilities in the area but there were no vacancies. I suggested a facility I knew of that provided great care where I had a good relationship with the management.  I was able to secure the next vacancy and reduce ongoing costs by $50K. The sisters were very grateful and told me “We couldn’t ask for a better facility for Dad.  It’s very quiet, light and cheerful and the staff are very friendly”. Stories like these make my role as an Aged Care Placement Consultant very rewarding.

 

 

 

 

Senior Forums on Aged Care in Melbourne

Reporting on an aged care forum held recently with seniors in the eastern suburbs of Melbourne facilitated by Aged Care Minister, Ken Wyatt AM, and Member for Chisholm, Julia Banks MP, Ms Banks said “In the electorate of Chisholm, residents aged 65 and over make up 16 per cent of the population and this is set to grow to more than 25 per cent by 2050.”

She made reference to the Aged Care Diversity Framework that was released by the federal government in December as a perfect example how barriers that may exist to accessing appropriate aged care can be eliminated. She spoke of the diverse backgrounds of her electorate saying
“We have welcomed a large number of people from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds who contribute so much to the fabric of our local community. We are committed to ensuring that all Australians have access to safe, quality and respectful care and that the diversity of race, religion, language, sexuality and gender is reflected in the care options available.”

With three aged care action plans being drafted under the Diversity Framework, designed to help guarantee equity of access to care, Mr. Wyatt once again stated that people are living longer than ever before and his vision for ageing and aged care was unwavering.  He further stated the government’s aim is to consistently deliver quality aged care that is accessible, affordable and sustainable and that forums like this helps the government understand what is working and what needs to be improved.

Aged care is currently somewhat of a mixed bag and, as an Aged Care Consultant,  I constantly seek the best options for my clients moving into aged care facilities.  Thankfully the standards are lifting across the board and the government’s reforms will hopefully enshrine the best possible standards of care for our elderly Australians.

Reference: Department of Health Media Hub