Visitors to Aged Care Homes

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The Prime Minister went on national television last Tuesday to tell aged care facilities in Australia to go easy on their lockdown measures. He said the recommendation from the national cabinet was for a maximum of two visits per resident per day in the resident’s room. He was concerned for the welfare and health of residents in aged care if they were not receiving regular visits from their families.

Several things have come to my notice as an Aged Care Placement Consultant about the situation. Aged Care Facilities seem to vary from one to another with how they are dealing with COVID-19, as mentioned in my last blog. When it comes to visitors some are in strict lockdown, others are following the government recommendations. Staff are busier than ever, as they don’t have the help of volunteers and other support services; for example, they are having to conduct all the activities to keep residents occupied.

General Secretary of the NSW Nurses and Midwives Associations, Brett Holmes, said the government needed to provide additional staff to aged care facilities so they could screen visitors before allowing them in. I agree with this and can understand the difficulties aged care homes will face in monitoring visitors, I’m aware that even at the moment where families are allowed to visit their loved ones in palliative care, in some facilities it is only for 15 minutes, yet when asked to leave they ask for another 5 minutes, then another 5 – this all takes up staff time, adding an extra burden. There will be further calls on staff time when the directive starting in May that visitors must have the up to date flu immunisation comes into effect, as this will need policing.

Brett Holmes went on to say “There are qualified nurses out there looking for work and if the Commonwealth Government wants to open up the aged care facilities, then that should be done in the safest possible way.That should also mean of course the additional resources of PPE to allow that screening to be undertaken in the same way that our public health system is responding to this risk of people from outside the facility bringing in the COVID-19.”

I have noticed when that some aged care facilities are contacting families and asking them if they are content with the precautions the facility is taking and, to my knowledge, most families are generally understanding why the facilities have taken those precautions and that it is for the protection of residents.

Last week I placed a gentleman in an aged care facility and his wife was upset that she couldn’t visit him over the weekend. As I have said before, each facility is dealing with the situation differently. The same goes for retirement villages. I am helping a client to find a suitable retirement village and one place we were interested in would not allow a site visit but also won’t allow a resident to move in unless they have seen the facility in person. Another retirement village will allow a site visit, but only one person at a time.

I am finding that only people in an emergency are now seeking aged care accommodation as they don’t want to self isolate within the facility for 14 days once they move in, they don’t like the idea of no visitors and don’t want to spend the money and make a monumental move to a home site-unseen. Trying times indeed!

 

 

How Aged Care Facilities Respond to COVID-19

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With the corona virus pandemic now in Australia there are changes to how aged care facilities are able to operate.

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In my role as Placement Consultant I help clients find suitable accommodation in aged care facilities in Melbourne. I’m currently getting frequent updates from aged care facilities on changes to their protocols. Fortunately most aged care facilities still currently taking new residents and, in some cases, respite residents. There seems to be a general requirement for new residents to self isolate for 14 days when they move into their new home. However, the need for this varies from facility to facility, with some making it mandatory for all new intakes, whilst others have made it only for those who answer positively to questions about their symptoms and/or exposure to COVID-19 or carefully check on resident’s health upon intake.

I had a client recently who I had trouble placing into a facility as she was unable to do the 14 day isolation due to memory loss. Fortunately I was able to find another suitable facility whose policy is if a new resident comes from home they will have their temperature taken and be monitored. As my client was coming from home she was accepted. However, this facility requires new residents to self isolate for 14 days If coming directly from hospital. Some facilities can no longer accept people living with dementia or people that wander as they are unable to provide care for them with the social distancing restrictions now in place.

Restrictions around visitors also vary between aged care facilities with some putting in place a total ban for visitors, with some allowance when residents are in palliative care, and others allowing minimal visitors as per the government guidelines of no more than two at a time, once a day.

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Most visits to inspect facilities are now virtual with a range of sophistication there; some have film crews do a professional video tour whilst others film the facility themselves. Some facilities will meet with you and show photos and some will even allow a personal tour but with strict cleanliness and health protocols in place.

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It is challenging keeping up with all the different protocols in the various facilities and another reason my clients find my services so helpful  as I sift through these frequent updates to keep them informed.

 

 

 

 

Aged Care As the Population Ages

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It’s a great outcome in health terms that Australians have one of the highest life expectancies in the world. But this presents certain challenges with an increasing ageing population. The baby boomers, those born just after the second world war, are now ageing, with the first of them turning 65 in 2011. As a result in 2017 3.8 million Australians were in the 65 and over age range. This represented 15 per cent of the population. By 2050, 1.8 million people will be over the age of 85.

At the same time we have a decline in fertility rates, with the number of children per woman falling from 3.5 to 1.8.

Healthcare

Naturally, health care is going to become a high priority as the population continues to age. According to a report by the Parliamentary Budget Office, demand for health services rise upon a person reaching their 70s, with the need for aged care services increasing further when they reach the age of 80.

There is a movement away from hospital care to at-home support services. People would much rather be treated and looked after within their own home than spend lengthy periods of time in hospital. It is also a more cost effective method of providing adequate health care to the elderly. So, in terms of primary care costs this is an improvement. However, the system needs re-evaluation to keep up with demand.

Aged care facilities will still be needed for people with high demand needs, such as 24 hour care. Ensuring they are managed and staffed to a level that the community finds acceptable is of utmost importance. I know from my experience as a Placement Consultant that there are many very well run aged care facilities that meet expectations, but there are those that do not. I scrupulously research facilities for my clients and follow up with them to ensure they and their families are satisfied.

We must aim for a standard across the board that provides excellent care and respect for our elderly. After all they paved the way for the rest of us to live in such a privileged society.

A New Test To Tackle Falls in The Elderly

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Older people fear having a fall, more than a bag snatch or a home invasion, according to Professor Stephen Lord, a senior principal fellow at Neuroscience Research Australia at the launch of a new screening test for falls, a collaboration between NeuRA and the aged care company, the Mark Moran Group. He stated that the reason they fear this so much is it is often the precursor to losing their independence. Once an elderly person goes to the Emergency Department of a hospital as a result of a fall and into the hospital system, they are often assessed as being unable to continue caring for themselves, resulting in them moving to an aged care facility.

Research shows one in three people over 65 will have one or more falls every year. At that rate the number of new hospitals will have to increase at a rapid rate to cope with falls related injuries.

Professor Lord stated that the cost of falls to the economy is greater than any other injury, including car crashes.

If a fall is serious, 43 per cent of people aged 70 or older who have one will be admitted to hospital. Currently, falls account for 250,000 hospital bed days every year, and will rise to 450,000 by 2050. Of those who are hospitalised, about 10 per cent will move to an aged care facility for the first time.

The new screening test, launched this week, can predict with 75 per cent accuracy the risk of someone over 60 having a fall – and recommend ways to prevent one. The kit, FallScreen +, has nine assessments. These relate to general wellbeing, including pain and mental health; regular exercise; executive function (which includes ability to assess and negotiate hazards in an unfamiliar place), and eyesight, including ability to see light and shade (which helps to avoid trip hazards).

The kit will be trialled at aged care facilities owned by the Mark Moran Group, and will also be released as an app pitched at those who work in aged care, including physiotherapists, psychologists and others. A simplified test is being developed for general practitioners.

As an Aged Care Placement Consultant I highly recommend that elderly people have a future plan in place so that if they do have a fall or several falls and find themselves in a situation where they can no longer stay safely in their home, they have a plan B ready to go. If they have developed a plan, they are in a position of having more choice and being able to move to a facility that suits their needs, tastes and location. This can make a big difference to the outcome; it can be a positive move.

Some facts taken from Julie Power’s Sydney Morning Herald article published Aug 27 2019.