A New Approach To Design of Aged Care Facilities

Aged Care Facility

An Aged Care Facility

A group of design professionals, innovators, planners and seniors came together in a charrette (a workshop devoted to planning a design or solving a problem) to look at a new way of creating aged care facilities. Rather than design just for comfort, or looks, the group aim was to design to aid longevity. Hosted by The University of Queensland and DMA Engineers, the 120 assembled experts considered this a rare opportunity for teams of people from different fields to collaborate in some blue sky thinking.

DMA Engineers managing director Russell Lamb discussed the current dischotomy.

“It’s quite restrictive. In fact, it’s probably one of the most restrictive. I think that’s one of the struggles that the industry’s dealing with at the moment, where we hear terms about ageing in place, but if you go from a retirement living facility, where it’s in most regards an apartment that younger people in their twenties, thirties, forties may be happy to live in, to when you’re actually going to an aged care Class 9C patient room. The amount of services and facilities within that room are fundamentally different.

“One of the challenges the industry is really faced with is how we can have a space which transforms over a matter of years and transforms in a way that maintains the character of the place and doesn’t become too clinical, too quickly.”

The group was challenged to create visionary, innovative and highly connected designs to meet the needs of an intergenerational community in 2050. It was noted that too often aged care facilities are cut off from the wider community by virtue of cheaper land forcing providers to the outskirts of town.

The University of Queensland’s Director of the Healthy Ageing Initiative, Professor Laurie Buys, said

“Older people are thinking and acting very differently than ever before, and we know that future generations of older people will have very high expectations about maintaining their engaged lifestyles.”

The experts gathered into groups and took part in a design competition. The chance to throw the rule book out of the window was appealing for many of the designers who were able to think more generally about how the needs of older people can be met in a hypothetical way, rather than designing to a client’s brief. A common thread emerged of physical and social connectedness, key to promoting increased choice, economic development and job creation. Designs visualized spaces that enabled older people to be creative and productive rather than just existing in places with activities to pass the time away.

 

Thanks to Aged Care Insite for information used in this blog.

 

 

Aged Care Placement During The Corona Virus Pandemic

orlando aged care

As we all face the effects of the COVID-19 virus in our community, it is of particular concern in aged care facilities, where the most vulnerable people reside. Ever more draconian restrictions are being put in place in the wider community to try to control the spread of the virus. Aged care facilities are particularly at risk and so they have to be even more restrictive. The government has introduced a two person only visit limit to each resident and have restricted gathering in communal areas. Some facilities have put in even stricter limits, such as only allowing family to visit or completely locking down, allowing no visitors.

Despite the new regulations, social distancing and self isolation in the wider community, there will still be those elderly people who have a fall or get very ill with heart attacks, strokes, dementia and other health problems who end up needing to go into an aged care facility. Also, due to the self isolating or lockdown situations now being enforced there are elderly people, particularly those living with dementia, who will no longer have the level of care they need. I had three such cases last week that all required emergency placement in an aged care facility.

The first was an ‘at risk 93 year old woman’, living with dementia, alone in an apartment in Docklands,. Her son lives in the USA and her sister in law in Albury, NSW. As she now needed to move into a facility the family wanted accommodation in Albury so she could be near her sister in law. They asked me to find a suitable facility and organize the transfer. I found a suitable facility and the son had to make the decision sight unseen, trusting my judgment. With the help of a case manager and a private carer I arranged for transportation. Due to the changing directions coming from the government, the facility was changing its protocols daily which delayed her being admitted and resulted in her staying a night in Albury and the private carer taking her to the facility, where she had to start a 14 day isolation. Very difficult circumstances for an elderly lady living with dementia. Happily, she is settled and doing well.

The second was a gent with dementia living with his wife who had serious health issues. His behaviour had exacerbated and she was concerned about keeping him locked in the house if the lock-down got worse, which it has. This was a difficult process as her children thought she should keep him at home as she had signed up for ‘better or worse’.  He also had to go in without her looking at the room and undergo social isolation for 14 days.

The third was another woman living with dementia in a fully independent, serviced apartment in Carlton.  This was also an urgent situation as there is no one to go in and check on her and she is living alone and isolated with dementia. Fortunately I have been able to place her as well.

There has definitely been a rise in demand for help in finding suitable aged care.The service I provide means I source a facility that is suitable in terms of location, programmes, affordability, staffing levels, type of accommodation, services offered and outings. Because I research the facilities, visit most of them and know many of the managers I have an inside knowledge about how they operate and how suitable they will be for my clients.

These are challenging times for us all, and for an elderly person living with dementia having to move from their home it is extremely stressful. . I am grateful that now, more than ever, I can be of assistanceto ease this distress, fear and anxiety as I have a counselling qualification, which gives me the skills to really help people going through this transition.