ACAT Assessment and Specialist Dementia Care Program

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ACAT Assessment

The Australian Government Department of Health has in recent times received a number of enquiries from providers of aged care about when an Aged Care Assessment Team (ACAT) assessment is required. The department states that “A subsidy cannot be paid to an approved provider for providing care to a person, unless the person is approved under the Aged Care Act 1997 (the Act) as a care recipient.

An ACAT assessment is required if a person is seeking access to aged care services that are funded under the Act, such as:

  • Residential Care
  • Flexible Care in the form of Transition Care or Short-Term Restorative Care
  • Residential Respite Care
  • a Home Care Package. “

 

New Initiative Rollout 2019

One of the Department of Health’s new initiatives – the Specialist Dementia Care Program (SDCP) is beginning to roll out.

This program will provide care for people exhibiting very severe behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD), who are unable to be appropriately cared for by mainstream aged care services.

The SDCP will offer specialised, transitional residential support, focussing on reducing or stabilising symptoms over time. I have, at times, been in the position of finding suitable accommodation for people exhibiting behaviour that cannot be managed in the aged care residential service in which they reside. It is a difficult situation and, as an Aged Care Support Consultant, I applaud the introduction of specialist services to accommodate people in this position.

The department has advertised a targeted grant opportunity for a prototype SDCP service, with the next round of 14 SDCP grant opportunities to be advertised early this year. This first phase of specialist dementia care units is expected to be operational in early 2020 with a full rollout in 2022-23. It is expected that there will be at least one specialist dementia care unit (within a broader residential aged care service) operating in each of the 31 Primary Health Networks.

One of the objectives of the SDCP is to generate evidence on best practice care for people exhibiting very severe behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia that can be adapted for use in mainstream settings to benefit all people with dementia.

Source: Australian Government Department of Health website.

 

Respite Care in Aged Care Facilities

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Respect is vital

Caregiving can be a highly demanding and stressful responsibility. Whilst allowing their loved one to remain in the home, it takes a lot of dedication and focus to continue to provide the level of care they require. Sometimes a caregiver needs a break, either a holiday to rest and recuperate from their ongoing responsibilities or due to their own health problems or other matters they need to attend to.

Respite care provides a short-term break for caregivers that can relieve their stress, renew their energy and restore a sense of balance to their lives. It gives them a period of freedom from caregiving duties, knowing their loved ones will continue to receive the care they require in a safe, caring and professional environment.

Another reason an elderly person may go into respite care in an aged care facility is to try out the facility. It gives them an opportunity to experience the high level of professional care, social activities and companionship an aged care home can provide. They will generally only be in respite care for a few weeks and quite often they enjoy their time there so much they ask to move in permanently.

Caregivers commonly use respite care when:

  • They need to travel.
  • They need a break.
  • Their loved one wants a trial for a senior community.
  • Their loved one needs a change of pace.
  • The need to help their loved one ease into permanent senior living.

The term “respite care” is not covered under the NDIS, this has caused stress to some caregivers who need to have a break and whose loved ones are receiving an NDIS package of support. Carers Victoria spoke to the NDIS who assured them they do support carers; their CEO Rob de Luca said “As part of the NDIS, we understand the importance of providing carers with the opportunity like all families to take a break from time to time – to sustain their capacity to provide informal supports to NDIS participants. Supports funded in NDIS plans include Short Term Accommodation (STA), in-home supports, community access and personal care – all of which are designed to support participants and reduce the demands on carers.”

I am an Aged Care Placement Consultant and have seen clients of mine go into respite care either to try it out or to provide their carer with a break and enjoy their time there so much they decide to move to an aged care facility permanently. These people usually transfer very successfully to their new home.