Aged Care As the Population Ages

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It’s a great outcome in health terms that Australians have one of the highest life expectancies in the world. But this presents certain challenges with an increasing ageing population. The baby boomers, those born just after the second world war, are now ageing, with the first of them turning 65 in 2011. As a result in 2017 3.8 million Australians were in the 65 and over age range. This represented 15 per cent of the population. By 2050, 1.8 million people will be over the age of 85.

At the same time we have a decline in fertility rates, with the number of children per woman falling from 3.5 to 1.8.

Healthcare

Naturally, health care is going to become a high priority as the population continues to age. According to a report by the Parliamentary Budget Office, demand for health services rise upon a person reaching their 70s, with the need for aged care services increasing further when they reach the age of 80.

There is a movement away from hospital care to at-home support services. People would much rather be treated and looked after within their own home than spend lengthy periods of time in hospital. It is also a more cost effective method of providing adequate health care to the elderly. So, in terms of primary care costs this is an improvement. However, the system needs re-evaluation to keep up with demand.

Aged care facilities will still be needed for people with high demand needs, such as 24 hour care. Ensuring they are managed and staffed to a level that the community finds acceptable is of utmost importance. I know from my experience as a Placement Consultant that there are many very well run aged care facilities that meet expectations, but there are those that do not. I scrupulously research facilities for my clients and follow up with them to ensure they and their families are satisfied.

We must aim for a standard across the board that provides excellent care and respect for our elderly. After all they paved the way for the rest of us to live in such a privileged society.

Behind The Scenes of The Old People’s Home for 4 Year Olds

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A recent interview by Aged Care Insite with Professor Susan Kurrle, director of the Cognitive Decline Partnership Centre at the University of Sydney, who worked on the recent ABC documentary The Old People’s Home for 4 Year Olds, provides some interesting insights to the program. (Photo from Aged Care Insite)

This experiment is the first of its kind conducted in Australia and Professor Kurrle believes the implications of this successful trial could be huge. The ABC show follows the progress of a group of aged care residents taking part in structured activities with a group of pre-schoolers who visit their aged care home on a regular basis.

The resident-to-resident relationship building that has arisen as a result of the experiment has obvious benefits to health, Professor Kurrle said. It was a surprise side effect of the experiment and those relationships have continued in a healthy way. Some residents felt quite lonely and isolated prior to the trial.

Allowing young children day-to-day contact with their elders can also combat ageism she said. The children who took part also benefited growing in their confidence and interactions and developing of empathy. One particularly touching moment was when one young child, whose parents described him as a “soft soul”, showed empathy for a depressed resident who was not participating or speaking and had his eyes closed, by going up to him and being with him, drawing the resident out until he broke into a beaming smile.

This experiment was the first time that structured activities were used to encourage interactions between the children and adults as they worked together to achieve particular goals. Other intergenerational programs with pre schoolers have not been structured in this way, with the children simply playing side by side with the residents. Professor Kurrle pointed out that humans are pack animals and crave the companionship of family. For residents whose families are far away or unable to visit life can become lonely. This program allowed them the opportunity to interact with young children, as they would with their grand children. The health benefits were proven by standardised health tests before and after the program.

Professor Kurrle assured the interviewer that the children weren’t encouraged by producers on the show to behave in certain ways to develop the story. All behaviour on the show was spontaneous. The only people in the room were the participants, the instructor and some of her assistants to help with the children. The cameras and microphones were hidden.

Suggestions coming out of the success of the program about how to do more intergenerational programs in aged care facilities include encouraging playgroups to set up their activities within aged care facilities. Another was for aged care providers to consider building childcare facilities within their buildings when building a new facility or upgrading an existing one.

Trailer for the ABC program

 

The Matter of Your Will

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I am an aged care Placement Specialist and I have an 84 year old client right now who is fighting for a fair share of the proceeds from the house he shared with his wife so he can afford to go into and aged care facility to be cared for. Unfortunately for him they decided many years ago to put the house in his wife’s name so it would not be affected if the business he was running ran into difficulties.  They had mirror wills to protect him. A year ago his wife was diagnosed with a terminal illness and her estranged son came back into her life. When she passed on a new will came to light, in which her husband is disadvantaged.

Although this is a complex case, it made me think about how people could be adversely affected if there was no will at all. Sadly if you don’t have a legally binding will your wishes may not be followed, and the distribution of your estate may become one great bun-fight

This may end up costing a fortune in legal fees and cause more heart-ache to your already grieving family, yet many people put off making a will, which can ensure their wishes are met and bring peace of mind to themselves and those they love.

When making a will it is generally advised to use a Lawyer or the Trustee and Guardian in your state rather than make a DIY will, especially if you have substantial assets or your wishes are complex. It is also important to remember to have your will updated if there are any changes to your wishes or assets. So, now you have your will, what do you do with it?

Keeping it at home can be problematic as it may be difficult to find and there is the risk of it being destroyed by fire, tampered with or stolen. A safety deposit box you would think a good option, but it can be almost impossible for family to get hold of if they don’t have legal access to the box.  Storing it with your Lawyer is another option, but it can be lost in transition if the business is sold or the Lawyer dies, although legally they have an obligation to ensure all documents are transferred to another law firm.

The State Trustees of Victoria have set up the Victorian Will & Powers of Attorney Registry, a free initiative where anyone in Victoria can register information about the location of their will and powers of attorney documents safely or physically store their original documents with them.

The Registry will help Executors and Attorneys find documents with ease, ensuring your wishes are acted upon when the time comes. Their website states “These documents are your voice and it is essential to safeguard them securely rather than leave them to chance.”

More information about Jillian Slade

Benetas The Views At Heidelberg Wins MBA Award

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To have an Aged Care Facility’s builder receive the Master Builders Association of Victoria (MBAV) Excellence in Construction of Commercial Buildings $20M-30M is a break-through in aged care residential design. The Benetas The Views at Heidelberg 103-bed, state-of-the-art, apartment-style living residence in Melbourne’s North East opened in October 2018, and was designed to support the industry-leading Benetas Best Life Model of Care. Creating a genuine household environment, each apartment has its own kitchen, lounge and dining areas with residents having their own private room with an ensuite.

Benetas CEO Sandra Hills OAM, said the win was well deserved “ADCO Constructions did a fantastic job on The Views, which was a really important development for Benetas,” she said. “It was our first building constructed from the ground up to accommodate the Best Life Model of Care and ADCO exceeded our expectations.”

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ADCO Constructions Senior Design Manager, Glen Blamey, said the company was thrilled with the win.

The Views at Heidelberg will shortly celebrate its first year since last year’s launch with positive feedback on the Best Life Model of Care and the building itself. I was fortunate to visit the newly built facility last year, having been invited in my role as a Placement Consultant and was impressed by the quality and style of building and fittings, as well as the concept of care.

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Of the thirteen aged care apartments, each has seven or eight residents who are supported and encouraged to continue pursuing their hobbies and interests through a lively activities program with a happy hour, bus tours, fitness programs and movie screenings. Facilities also include a café and sports bar,

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wellness centre/day spa, hairdressing salon, arts and crafts room, cinema and library.

Being an Aged Care Placement Consultant I visit many aged care homes and it is encouraging to see innovative styles of aged care being adopted.

 

Respite Care in Aged Care Facilities

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Respect is vital

Caregiving can be a highly demanding and stressful responsibility. Whilst allowing their loved one to remain in the home, it takes a lot of dedication and focus to continue to provide the level of care they require. Sometimes a caregiver needs a break, either a holiday to rest and recuperate from their ongoing responsibilities or due to their own health problems or other matters they need to attend to.

Respite care provides a short-term break for caregivers that can relieve their stress, renew their energy and restore a sense of balance to their lives. It gives them a period of freedom from caregiving duties, knowing their loved ones will continue to receive the care they require in a safe, caring and professional environment.

Another reason an elderly person may go into respite care in an aged care facility is to try out the facility. It gives them an opportunity to experience the high level of professional care, social activities and companionship an aged care home can provide. They will generally only be in respite care for a few weeks and quite often they enjoy their time there so much they ask to move in permanently.

Caregivers commonly use respite care when:

  • They need to travel.
  • They need a break.
  • Their loved one wants a trial for a senior community.
  • Their loved one needs a change of pace.
  • The need to help their loved one ease into permanent senior living.

The term “respite care” is not covered under the NDIS, this has caused stress to some caregivers who need to have a break and whose loved ones are receiving an NDIS package of support. Carers Victoria spoke to the NDIS who assured them they do support carers; their CEO Rob de Luca said “As part of the NDIS, we understand the importance of providing carers with the opportunity like all families to take a break from time to time – to sustain their capacity to provide informal supports to NDIS participants. Supports funded in NDIS plans include Short Term Accommodation (STA), in-home supports, community access and personal care – all of which are designed to support participants and reduce the demands on carers.”

I am an Aged Care Placement Consultant and have seen clients of mine go into respite care either to try it out or to provide their carer with a break and enjoy their time there so much they decide to move to an aged care facility permanently. These people usually transfer very successfully to their new home.

 

Delicious Introduction To Brain Food vs Dementia

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I recently attended a networking lunch hosted by Home Instead Brighton held at The Crescent in Brighton with guest speaker author Ngaire Hobbins. I found Ngaire’s presentation very informative as it highlighted the role of food for the older person living at home or in residential care. We were treated to a lovely tasting lunch with recipes from her book ‘Better Brain Food: eat to cheat dementia and cognitive decline.’  The Chef at The Crescent prepared the dishes from Michelle Crawford’s delightful recipes used in the book.

Ngaire Hobbins, APD, BSc., Dip. Nutrition and Diet, is a dietitian and researcher with a special passion for geriatric nutrition. She is committed to ensuring that the frail elderly have the very best food possible available to them. Most people – be they frail or fighting fit – are unaware that public health messages which are ideal for younger adults can instead be unhelpful, even harmful, for those entering their senior years.  In the science section of the book Ngaire offers insight on the importance of the gut-brain axis and looks at the pros and cons of the latest ‘superfoods’ and diet trends. She also advises what food should be eaten in each decade as a person ages to boost brain health.

‘Better Brain Food’is an important read, especially for anyone involved in aged care residential support as it discusses the science of nutrition and cognitive health and provides seventy tasty recipes based on this science, making it easy to follow Ngaire’s advice. Having visited many aged care facilities in my time as a Placement Consultant I know how important food is to the residents. For their ongoing health and well-being they should be served delicious meals that are nutritious and boost their brain health. This book will be an invaluable resource to this end.

Seek Professional Advice On Retirement Village Contracts

Four Corners and Fairfax Media have recently reported on a story about retirement village living which is worrying. My advice to anyone contemplating entering a retirement village is that they should first speak with their family and let them know what they are planning before entering into any contract. They should also seek legal advice about the details of any contract they contemplate entering into, seeking clarification on not only the financial aspects of the contract but also looking at the fine print on lifestyle regulations. This is good practice for any contract, but particularly in the instance of retirement living as the stakes are so high.

Aged Care is not a trademark and any organisation can state they provide aged care. It’s important to understand the difference between private retirement living companies who advertise that they provide aged care and Government funded aged care.

Checking out all aspects of a retirement village or aged care facility is extremely important. This is one of the reasons clients use my aged care consultancy services.They know they will have a professional who will find them the right place to live in their later years and that I will thoroughly assess the suitability of each option. I recommend that my clients seek further professional input from their legal advisors and financial planners experienced in the aged care field.

During my career as an Aged Care Placement Consultant I have seen many cases where a knowledgeable Financial Planner has given advice to a client that has made a positive difference to the type of accommodation they were able to acquire. I care very much for the welfare of all my clients and do not want to see them suffer as they make these very challenging transitions in life from their own home to a retirement village or an aged care facility.